Blog #2 Rhetoric

Rhetoric and Rhetorical appeals- Comic text uses an informal seemingly creative means of explaining rhetoric and what it means. The text is presented in comic strip form using informal speech along with some mild humor. Using this format, this text can appeal to a younger audience, and make the idea of rhetoric easier to understand. In this text, Rhetoric is defined as a way of thinking about how you talk that makes discussion easier. It is said to supply the skills needed to form ideas, argue them, and accomplish goals or make tough choices. This culture shows  rhetorical practices in debates, elections, online profiles, and  social networks. In a political debate, you speak in a certain way and use your words and ideas to persuade the public into voting for you rather than your opponent. In elections the same idea applies as you make many promises and ideas of reform to gain the popular vote. This is used heavily in this culture. In a less formal setting, online profiles are another form of rhetorical practice. On your online profile you seek to make yourself seem interesting. You may use a manor of pictures and words to accomplish this. Social media uses this too, though what you say and post on these sites can make or break you in a sense. It can impact your ethos negatively or positively depending on what is posted. What you post may also seek to appeal to others pathos.

African communicative practices on the other hand explains rhetoric differently. In this case the text is in book format and its overall fairly formal. It explains rhetoric a bit more complexly compared to the comic the format the previous text used. This text seems more targeted towards the adult age. This particular culture sees rhetoric as an ancient and traditional communicative practice that focusses on “building community and bringing good in the world”. They practice this form of rhetoric through speaking in African, as African American rhetoric is also the study of the African languages.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s